Low flying B52 planes

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Low flying B52 planes

Check out these photos of low flying bombers. I think both photos are of the same plane, note the second plane behind the bomber in the first photo, from which the second photo would have been taken.

B-52-FlyBy.jpg - 16.35kb
By netchicken: posted on 4-12-2006

Just found some info...

It happened in early 1990 in the Persian Gulf, while U.S. carriers and B-52s were holding joint exercises. Two B-52s called the carrier (USS Ranger) and asked if they could do a fly-by, and the carrier air controller said yes.

When the B-52s reported they were 9 kilometers out, the carrier controller said he didn't see them. The B-52s told the carrier folks to look down. The paint job on the B-52 made it hard to see from above, but as it got closer, the sailors could make it out, and the water the B-52 jets were causing to spray out. It's very, very rare for a USAF aircraft to do a fly-by below the flight deck of a carrier.

But B-52s had been practicing low level flights for years, to come in under Soviet radar. In this case, the B-52 pilots asked the carrier controller if they would like the bombers come around again. The carrier guys said yes, and a lot more sailors had their cameras out this time.

2-B52-flyby.jpg - 41.41kb
By netchicken: posted on 4-12-2006

Found this when trying to substantiate the pics...

There is a story told by many B-52 pilots that sums up the aircraft:

... Quote:
The B-52, with its familiar wrinkled fuselage sides, has enough metal to make 10,000 garbage cans.

The wiring in the Stratofortress is equivalent to five miles of baling wire. Its engines are as powerful as eight locomotives.

And that's the way it flies, like eight locomotives, pulling ten thousand garbage cans with five miles of baling wire!



 http://en.wikipedia.org/wik...
By netchicken: posted on 5-12-2006

Found the same pic here
 http://www.oldoppos.us/gall...

with the comment

Persian Gulf 1990 this is what you call low flying. B52 fly by
By netchicken: posted on 5-12-2006

Heres another article on it
 http://strategypage.com/mil...

This site is really good, I doubt that they would be fooled by photoshop

... Quote:
This is not photoshopped. It happened in early 1990 in the Persian Gulf, while U.S. carriers and B-52s were holding joint exercises.

Two B-52s called the carrier (USS Ranger) and asked if they could do a fly-by, and the carrier air controller said yes. When the B-52s reported they were 9 kilometers out, the carrier controller said he didn't see them. The B-52s told the carrier folks to look down.

The paint job on the B-52 made it hard to see from above, but as it got closer, the sailors could make it out, and the water the B-52 jets were causing to spray out. It's very, very rare for a USAF aircraft to do a fly-by below the flight deck of a carrier. But B-52s had been practicing low level flights for years, to come in under Soviet radar.

In this case, the B-52 pilots asked the carrier controller if they would like the bombers come around again. The carrier guys said yes, and a lot more sailors had their cameras out this time.
By netchicken: posted on 5-12-2006

Hey they do fly really low, look at this video and the commentry.

By netchicken: posted on 5-12-2006

The bit that puzzles me, is why is it so difficult to fly a plane low?

Surely the combination of altimeter, or other ground aware technology, and advanced computing in a plane could see it automatically hug the ground at a predefined level without human intervention?

I would imagine that with todays avionics, you could plug into the onboard computer the instructions to do a loop at altitude X and drop out of it at Altitude y, then sit back and watch it happen.
By netchicken: posted on 28-10-2007

There are a couple things that make it a little risky.

Flying really low puts you where ground-based objects are higher. When really high meets really low, both objects become even lower.

You mentioned avionics. Military avionics is not the most current avionics out there. While the cruise control on my car still works fine after ten years and 200,000 miles, I have replaced components of flight control systems quite often on the three different types of military aircraft I have maintained.

Blasting through the air at 50,000 feet above sea level is a piece of cake. There are no references for the brain to use to feel the speed. At sea level, however, the brain is acutely aware of the speed, danger and stupidity of the circumstance. The brain likes to share the stress it experiences, so the body gets all tense and fatigued, too. This increases the chances of stuff happening.

Now, add pilot stress to bottom shelf avionics and objects reaching up to get in the way at inopportune times and you can see why it is not the piece of cake some might think it would be.
By Thomas_Crowne: posted on 22-10-2008

there is also the risk of hitting a different columm of air which could unbalance the air that it is flying through.
By nick123: posted on 20-8-2009








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