How the Pledge of Allegiance was meant to have been recited

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How the Pledge of Allegiance was meant to have been recited

Forget that hand on the heart movement, the Pledge was meant to have been done with the straight arm right hand salute.

The Bellamy salute is the hand gesture described by Francis Bellamy (1855-1931) to accompany the American Pledge of Allegiance, which he had authored. The gesture was derived from the Roman salute.

During the period when it was used with the Pledge of Allegiance, it was sometimes known as the "flag salute". It was first demonstrated on October 12, 1892 according to Bellamy's published instructions for the "National School Celebration of Columbus Day":

... Quote:
At a signal from the Principal the pupils, in ordered ranks, hands to the side, face the Flag. Another signal is given; every pupil gives the flag the military salute -- right hand lifted, palm downward, to a line with the forehead and close to it.

Standing thus, all repeat together, slowly, “I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands; one Nation indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all.”

At the words, “to my Flag,” the right hand is extended gracefully, palm upward, toward the Flag, and remains in this gesture till the end of the affirmation; whereupon all hands immediately drop to the side.


– From The Youth’s Companion, 65 (1892): 446–447.

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Bellamy_salute.jpg - 34.11kb
By netchicken: posted on 5-1-2009








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