TV display myths - nothing is what you think in TV settings - most are gimmicks to fool the buyers

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TV display myths - nothing is what you think in TV settings - most are gimmicks to fool the buyers

So you're looking at a new TV, and the plethora of controls it offers. Brightness, contrast, tint, etc, are all hanger on controls from old analogue TV's from the 1950's. Most monitor and HDTV user-menu options are actually unnecessary features added for marketing purposes—gimmicks to suggest the display has unique features that other models lack. Even worse, most of these options actually decrease image and picture quality.

In many cases, it’s not even clear what these sham controls really do. The documentation seldom explains them, and I even know engineers from high-level manufacturers who don’t know what the controls do, either. When I test TVs, I spend an inordinate amount of time using test patterns to figure out what the options and selections really do, and in most cases, turning off the fancy options leads to the best picture quality and accuracy.

Brightness and contrast controls shouldn’t be there because, for digital video, the black level is fixed at level 16, reference white at 235, and peak white at 255.

Similarly, tint and phase have no real meaning for digital signals. Finally, the sharpness control isn’t appropriate for digital displays because in a digital image there’s no transmission degradation—the image is received exactly as it appeared at the source.

Sharpening the image involves digitally processing the pixels, which leads to artifacts and noise unless it’s done at resolutions much higher than the final displayed resolution, which, of course, isn’t the case inside your monitor or HDTV.

The following is a list of useless (or near-useless) menu options and selections from three HDTVs sold by major brands:
Black Corrector,
Advanced CE,
Clear White,
Color Space,
Live Color,
DRC Mode,
DRC Palette,
Dynamic Contrast,
xvYCC,
Color Matrix,
RGB Dynamic Range,
Black Level,
Gamma,
White Balance,
HDMI Black Level,
Fresh Contrast,
Fresh Color,
Flesh Tone,
Eye Care,
Digital NR,
DNIe, Detail Enhancer,
Edge Enhancer,
Real Cinema,
Cine Motion,
Film Mode,
Blue Only Mode.

Read more of this fascinating article http://www.maximumpc.com/ar...
By netchicken: posted on 20-5-2010








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